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Who We Are

Crumb Brothers Artisan Bread is dedicated to crafting a fine selection of artisan breads, pastries, soups and sandwiches using time-honored techniques of preparation and baking.

“We Make Time for Good Bread” is our motto. “We Make Time for Customers” is our commitment.

Family owned and operated since 2001, Crumb Brothers includes its employees and customers as extended members of this bread loving family. We are strong supporters of the arts and showcase local photographers, painters, musicians and other artists in our café location.

Crumb Brothers Artisan Bread strives to “set the standard” for Northern Utah in providing a quality product in the most environmentally and socially responsible manner as possible. Our building, designed by local architect Joyce Popendorf, is the first commercial structure erected in the city of Logan, Utah, using geothermal heat exchange as a means to conserve our consumption of marketed energy–natural gas and electricity. Passive solar in our construction further offsets the energy load of running this business.

For our customer and employee comfort, the building is designed to maximize the use of available natural light and circulating fresh air to create a healthy and comfortable environment. Our landscaping promotes water-conserving plantings and practices.

In general, Crumb Brothers Artisan Bread seeks to promote both a sensitivity to a quality of life reflected in the quality of our breads and how we make them.


Our Process

Artisan Baking


Originally made in small communal ovens in Europe for neighborhood markets, artisan breads became part of a community’s identity. It is our hope that the presence of our breads on your table and the presence of our bakery in your community enriches your sense of community.

Our Bakery


To be true to the concept of a bakery as part of a community, this bakery was intentionally located to capture a neighborhood, rather than a commercial, feel. Logan’s “west side” neighborhood not only showcases some of the earliest residential homes in Cache Valley but also is at the crossroads of several innovative businesses: Design West restored a neighboring lumber mill as its business offices; Logan City restored and renovated its Art Deco power plant; and, across the street, The Green House, a landscaping and garden business, provided many of the native plantings for the bakery’s xeriscape.

Originally, our one-acre lot was the lumber yard for the historic Anderson Lumber Company. The property boundary on the west is part of Logan’s unique canal system that still delivers irrigation water to the neighborhood.

Local architect, Joyce Popendorf, took all of the above environmental considerations to design a building that embraced sustainable design and use of available light and energy conservation while integrating into an existing neighborhood’s ambiance.

The evolving design for Crumb Brothers closely followed an architecture criterium, Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design, “LEED,” which is a green building certification program intended for promotion of a building’s performance based upon energy savings, water efficiency, CO2 emission reductions, enhancement of indoor environmental quality, and the stewardship of resources and sensitivity to impact.

Central to the bakery’s design is the geothermal heating/cooling system. The bakery’s design also includes a passive solar wall to boost make-up air heating to reduce overall heating demands. The interior and exterior of the bakery incorporates many recycled materials, including tressel wood reclaimed from the Great Salt Lake tressels.

Ultimately, the bakery’s interior environment has been finely tuned with temperature-controlled zones to optimize bread and pastry production. Natural lighting is maximized to enhance the working environment. From the retail area, full-length doors fold back to create an indoor-outdoor seating space.

The bakery’s native planting and landscape design by Christopher Sands of Bio-West has become a demonstration for local gardeners that water-wise use combined with native plantings can be an aesthetically rewarding investment. Stands of native wheat grass honor the historical significance of wheat in our community.

The Oven


Our gas-fired hearth oven came from Italy via the San Francisco Baking Institute which has established a unique relation with a family in Verona to manufacture artisan bread ovens built to SFBI’s demanding specifications.

The Goods


We strive to source our products as local as possible using many partners in the valley as well as regionally and nationally. Using natural ingredients, we feel our end results are filling yet light, sustaining you for the rest of the days activities without bogging you down.